I came across this recently. It is a Class photograph of children at Broadmoor School in 1915. I see some similarities with some of the faces when compared with class photographs of the 1950s and 1960s. At this time, I believe that all the children attending lessons, there, were sons and daughters of Attendants at the Broadmoor Lunatic Asylum for the Criminally Insane.img038

Roughly two weeks after I was born, a Crowthorne resident [M. Ogden of Weston House, Church Street] left his bike in the care of the Southern Railway company at Crowthorne station. Two shillings and four pence for a week seems a lot of money for the time! Perhaps the owner was going on holiday?

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Here is a photograph of members of Crowthorne Post L2. Bottom right is Fred Bennellick. He lived a few doors down from us in Addiscombe Road in a lovely cottage. He used to play the Last Post at Crowthorne's Armistice Parade in the 50s and 60s. He had lost a leg at the Battle of the Somme in 1916.

Here is a photograph of members of Crowthorne Post L2. Bottom right is Fred Bennellick. He lived a few doors down from us in Addiscombe Road in a lovely cottage. He used to play the Last Post at Crowthorne’s Armistice Parade in the 50s and 60s. He had lost a leg at the Battle of the Somme in 1916.

http://vintagecrowthorne.tumblr.com

I have just posted five new images of Crowthorne on Tumblr.

Link  —  Posted: October 3, 2012 in Uncategorized

Crowthorne High Street in 1923

Here’s a great view looking up the start of the High Street. To the right is the chemist’s shop and then just past the entrance to Lower Broadmoor Road (a hundred yards further on the right) is the sweet shop. On the left is where the Iron Duke public house stood and then the International Store before the turn off into Church Street. I see from the photograph that there is a tree growing in front of what became Elston’s newsagents.

Image  —  Posted: September 23, 2012 in Uncategorized

Vintage Crowthorne

Posted: September 23, 2012 in Uncategorized

I have still to find the album containing almost one hundred old postcards of Crowthorne but, in the meantime, I have stored a few recent acquisitions on Tumblr. You can view them HERE.

Leaving Addiscombe Road, I would walk down to the end of Lower Broadmoor Road. The Iron Duke public house is visible across the road in this photograph, as is the large barrier that would be closed when a prisoner escaped or on boundary days when all the entrances and footways were guarded.

I always wondered what the building was to the left of the Iron Duke. Can anyone tell me? Further along to the right used to be the International Stores where lots of the goods were displayed in tins with a glass top. I can remember annoying the manager when I remembered a cartoon in the Dandy comic. Have you any broken biscuits, I asked. When he said, Yes, I said: “Why don’t you mend them then?” He was very unimpressed with me!